This is (Not) Church

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Just the other day I came across this website called Small Ritual. For many i am sure it is old news; however, for me it is quite fresh.
As i have thought about it more and more, I have come to think it is a great explaination of how urban communities of faith commune. As we have been exploring Shema community, many of the spaces that Steve seems to suggest I’m actually finding as accurately portrayed in our community here in Geneva.
I’m not sure what will come of this connection; however, I am sure of this: it’s good stuff.
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2 thoughts on “This is (Not) Church

  1. Hey dude.
    [Finds nice comfy chair, drops coat on back, makes cup of tea, comes back, settles in for the duration.]
    Oh absolutely. Church needs people’s different spaces and houses to happen in. Some people are hospitable – that’s cool. Some people, like me, are not, which merely means we have to buy people drinks more. But absolutely, you’re right: we can’t underestimate how much it’s on every one of us to build church.
    Anyway, all this merely to say: hi. Sorry I’m late – traffic was a nightmare – but I’m here now =o)

  2. The second model is an excellent representation of one of the most successful churches in the world–China’s house-church network. With the official estimates of Christians in China, counting only the official churches, you get a head-count of about 15 million. But, if you include the house-church network, it can be somewhere between 80-100 million.
    Also, the largest church in the world in Seoul, South Korea networks cell groups like that throughout people’s homes in the city.

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